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Texas Strangers

Tonight, two teams no one thought would be in the World Series square off — the San Francisco Giants, who haven’t won the big prize since 1954, when the team was in New York, and the Texas Rangers, who never have been to a World Series, despite playing in the American League since 1972. Actually they were the second-coming Washington Senators from 1961 to 1971, and they never made it to the Series either, making that a drought lasting 50 seasons.

Needless to say, Texas fans are deliriously happy. Maybe over-the-top happy.

There’s a Dallas lawyer named Darrell Cook, who months ago believed his beloved Rangers were tanking another season when he set a preliminary hearing for…Oct. 27, this morning. He bought tickets for Game 1 in San Francisco and he filed a motion for a continuance that Scribd calls the “Greatest Filing Ever from a Texas Rangers Fan.” You’ll have to read the motion, which makes reference to Darrell’s longstanding love for the team, the fact that the Yankees’ Alex Rodriguez (ARod a/k/a AFraud, according to the motion), a former Ranger, took a called third strike to give Texas the pennant and numerous other events this season. Don’t overlook the footnotes.

Good news for Cook. About an hour ago, he tweeted (#dwcook), “The judge just granted my motion to continue Whew. .Good thing- I am on a plane in Houston. Go #Rangers. That’s how lawyering go.”

Indeed.

Then there’s Boris Briskin. A native of Plano, Texas, Briskin, a 2009 graduate of Loyola law school, was a law clerk at a Los Angeles firm, according to LinkedIn.

Briskin quit his job at the firm to attend the World Series, reports KDFW, a Dallas-Fort Worth television station.

Briskin’s explanation: “It’s the Rangers. I’ve loved the Rangers for so long. They haven’t been to the playoffs since ’99. They’ve gone through so much since then. I really couldn’t miss this,” he said, admitting that he will blow a wad of cash for tickets.

He added that he is confident he’ll get a new job once he returns to California. Wonder how he’ll answer that “Reason for leaving prior employment” section on any job applications.

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