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Even Rick Perry would say, ‘Oops!’

A Fairfax judge has been found guilty of one of the most elementary computer security blunders. Read on.

Fairfax lawyer Sharon Nelson reports on her blog, Ride the Lightning, that she and her partner and husband, John Simek, were in one of the courtrooms at the Fairfax courthouse the other night giving a CLE session.

Simek was helping someone with a technology question, then he walked up to the bench. On the bench was the judge’s computer. And there it was: Attached to the judge’s monitor, for all to see, was a sticky note. With the judge’s user name. And the judge’s password.

Nelson’s response: “C’mon guys!” There is no rule of information security so fundamental, she said. You just don’t put a sticky note “with the keys to the castle” on your monitor, under your keyboard or in an easily accessible drawer, she added.

Wonder if the password was “123456.” As we have reported previously, that’s the most commonly used, and therefore most easily cracked, password.

Discretion being the better part of valor, Nelson didn’t name the errant judge or provide his/her courtroom number.

She did ask the rhetorical question, “Maybe we need to have a data security CLE for the judges?”

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